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Researchers on the Rise January 31, 2014, 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm WPIC Auditorium

Neural and Social Processes of Positive Affect in Children at Risk for Depression

Judith K. Morgan, PhD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry
University of Pittsburgh

 

 

 


Dr. Morgan earned her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at the University of Delaware and completed her clinical internship at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh with support from an NIMH Program to Enhance Diversity in Institutional T32 Supplemental Grant. Dr. Morgan was appointed to the Department of Psychiatry faculty in 2013. Her research focuses on early neurobehavioral and affective differences in children at biological risk for depression.  With support from a K01 Career Development Award from NIMH and under the mentorship of Dr. Erika Forbes, she is examining reward-related differences in young children of mothers with a history of depression relative to their low risk peers. Specifically, she is examining whether high risk children show alterations in reward brain function and behavioral reward seeking during this early developmental period. Additionally, she is exploring how maternal characteristics associated with depression, such as low levels of warmth, may impact affective and reward-related development in high risk children. 

Learning Objectives.  At the conclusion of this lecture, participants will be able to:

  1. Briefly describe neural and behavioral reward-related differences associated with risk for depression.
  2. Discuss how maternal characteristics can influence affective and reward-related development during early to middle childhood.
  3. Understand the importance of identifying early neurobehavioral risk factors in young children of depressed parents for preventive intervention purposes.

Statistical Methods for Improving Personalized Treatment in Psychiatry: Applications to Mood and Sleep Research

Meredith L. Wallace, PhD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry
University of Pittsburgh

  

 

Dr. Wallace earned her PhD in biostatistics from the University of Pittsburgh.  Following post-doctoral fellowships in both psychiatry and statistics, she was appointed to the Department of Psychiatry faculty in 2013.  Her research interests broadly revolve around developing and applying statistical methods to improve personalized medicine, and include moderator profiles in randomized clinical trials, decision trees, and clustering.   With support from a K01 Career Development Award from National Institute of Mental Health, Dr. Wallace is currently developing clustering methods that incorporate data captured across multiple units of analysis (e.g., self-report, behavior, physiology).   She applies these methods to data sets that cut across DSM diagnoses in order to reveal subgroups with different expressions of signs and symptoms.   Eventually, designing and targeting interventions for specific symptom profiles—rather than diagnoses—may help to improve treatment efficacy and effectiveness.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this lecture, participants will be able to:

  1. Recognize statistical methods that may assist in personalized clinical decision-making.
  2. Discuss how classification and clustering methods can be used to generate ideas for new treatment strategies.
  3. Better understand how NIMH "Research Domain Criteria" (RDoC) concepts can be applied to psychiatry data

Continuing Education Credit: The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits TM. Each physician should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Other health care professionals are awarded .15 continuing education units (CEUs), which are equal to 1.5 contact hours. In accordance with Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education requirements on disclosure, information about relationships of presenters with commercial interests (if any) will be included in materials which will be distributed at the time of the conference.  WPIC is approved by the American Psychological Association to offer continuing education for psychologists.  WPIC maintains responsibility for this program and its contents.  This program is being offered for 1.5 continuing education credits.

 

For more information on this lecture and other events, please contact Courtney Wallace at wallacecl@upmc.edu.