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Course Descriptions

Courses for the first three years of the Combine General and Child & Adolescent Program follow those of the General Program

Year 1    Year 2

Year 1

1.01:  Resident Orientation 

  1. Required; first year residents
  2. Abigail Schlesinger, MD; Roberto Ortiz, MD, chief resident and invited speakers
  3. Introduction to the first year of the fellowship and the role of the child and adolescent psychiatrist, systems issues in working with children, adolescents and their families clinically as well as systems issues inherent within this institution.  We also review legal aspects of providing care to children, didactics regarding abuse and the physicians’ role in assessment and reporting of suspected abuse and neglect and their families and goals/objectives of this training program.
  4. none
  5. 12 hours

1.02:  Assessment of Children and Adolescents 

  1. required; first year residents
  2. Rameshwari Tumuluru, MD
  3. General overview of interviewing children and adolescents and diagnostic formulation followed by observation of faculty interviewing children and adolescents.  Residents complete a write-up of the diagnostic assessment and clinical formulation.  This write-up is reviewed by Dr. Tumuluru and returned to the resident as feedback.
  4. None
  5. Three hour session, weekly for 4 weeks, 3 sessions

1.03:  Pharmacotherapy in children and adolescents

  1. required; first year residents
  2. Dara Sakolsky, MD and invited speakers
  3. General overview of psychopharmacologic principles when working with children and adolescents followed by a review of evidence for all classes of psychotropic medications used with this population
  4. none
  5. One hour session weekly for 8 weeks, 8 sessions

1.04:  Parent Management Seminar

  1. required, first year residents
  2. Amy Kelly, MD
  3. This interactive, didactic seminar utilizes an instruction manual, active discussion, role playing techniques to assist residents in learning about behavioral modification for parents. Dr. Kelly then provides ongoing supervision for residents with PMT cases
  4. None
  5. One hour session, weekly for 8 weeks; 8 sessions

1.05:  Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Seminar 

  1. required, first year residents
  2. Craig Coleman, MD
  3. Trainees learn to conduct cognitive and behavioral therapy with children and adolescents with depression and anxiety disorders, using a developmentally modified Beck’s model.  Teaching format includes lecture, guided readings, live patient interviews and case discussion in group supervision.
  4. None
  5. Three hour sessions, weekly for 4 weeks; 12 sessions

1.06:  Pediatric/Psychiatry Seminar

  1. required, first year residents
  2. Viveca Meyer, MD and invited pediatric and psychiatry staff and faculty
  3. Didactic presentations addressing topics and disorders falling in the interface between pediatrics and psychiatry, providing theoretical and practical information about assessment and treatment of psychiatric disorders in medically ill children , and psychiatric and psychosocial issues in the care of acutely and chronically ill pediatric patients.  Issues that arise regarding the role of a child psychiatrist consulting in a pediatric setting are also addressed.
  4. None
  5. Two hour sessions, weekly for 8 weeks; 16 sessions

1.07:  Disruptive Behavior Disorder Seminar

  1. required; first year residents
  2. Srihari Bangalore MD and selected psychiatry faculty members
  3. Didactic presentation reviewing phenomenology, epidemiology, nosology and treatment of disruptive behavior disorders (including oppositional disorder, conduct disorder, ADHD and substance use) in children and adolescents
  4. None
  5. One hour; weekly for 8 weeks;8 sessions

1.08:  Mood Disorders Seminar 

  1. required; first year residents
  2. David Axelson, MD, Boris Birmaher, MD and invited speakers
  3. Didactic presentation reviewing phenomenology, epidemiology, nosology and treatment of mood disorders (unipolar and bipolar) and anxiety in children and adolescents
  4. None
  5. One hour, weekly for 10 weeks; 10 sessions

1.09:  School Consultation Seminar

  1. required; first year residents
  2. Bradley Stein, MD, PhD
  3. Interactive seminar addressing; 1) educational issues in the care of children with psychiatric illnesses, 2) the role of the child psychiatrist consulting to schools, and 3) education and special education laws and legal issues. Residents will discuss a school consultation case during the seminar and also prepare and present a brief teacher in-service on a topic in child mental health.
  4. None
  5. Two hour sessions, weekly for 4 weeks; 8 sessions

1.10:  Journal Club

  1. required; first and second year residents
  2. Neal Ryan, MD
  3. This seminar requires that each resident select a review article on a topic of importance in child psychiatry, to review the strengths and weaknesses of the article, including methodology involved, and present this to the other class members
  4. Open to senior adult residents 
  5. One hour; 8 sessions throughout the academic year; 8 sessions

1.11:  Developmental Processes Seminar

  1. required; first and second year residents
  2. Jennifer Silk PhD, Alison Hipwell PhD and invited psychiatry faculty
  3. This interactive didactic seminar is designed to familiarize participants with normal development, developmental processes and trajectories.  There is an emphasis on brain and behavior interactions in development and an overall framework of clinical relevance to developmental, behavioral, and emotional disorders emerging in childhood and adolescence.  Participants are expected to learn about child and family development from gestation through young adulthood, using information drawn from psychology, developmental neurobiology, pediatrics, neuropsychology and epidemiology.
  4. Open to senior general adult residents, psychology interns and pediatrics residents
  5. Two hour sessions; weekly for nine months, every other year; 48 sessions

1.12:  Mental Retardation/Autism Seminar

  1. Required; first year residents
  2. Martin Lubetsky, MD and selected psychiatry and psychology faculty members
  3. Didactic presentation reviewing phenomenology, epidemiology, nosology and treatment of  mental retardation and autism spectrum disorders in children and adolescents
  4. None
  5. One hour; weekly for 8 weeks;8 sessions

1.13:  Clinical Grand Rounds

  1. required for all residents
  2. senior residents
  3. clinical presentation by senior adult and child residents followed by discussion by a panel of interdisciplinary members and also by the audience.  Topic is of the senior resident’s choosing.
  4. Open attendance
  5. One and a half hours; monthly for 10 months; 10 sessions

1.14:  International Adoption and Biracial Children

  1. Required; first year residents
  2. Wun Ju Kim, MD
  3. Over the two hour course, issues particular to adoption, international adoption and biracial children are explored from a cultural aspect as well as an integrative aspect
  4. None
  5. One hour for two weeks; 2 sessions

1.15:  Trauma – Assessment and Treatment

  1. Required; first and second year residents
  2. Judith Cohen, MD
  3. Over the course of 4 hours, issues related to Childhood Traumatic Stress will be presents.  These stresses encompass a range of immediate, short-term and chronic effects of a variety of traumatic events which happen to children and adolescents, such as child abuse, community and domestic violence, accidents, disasters, war and traumatic grief.  Cognitive Behavioral Therapy has been shown to be efficacious in treating these children, sometimes in conjunction with psychopharmacologic agents…a review of the current evidence to support these treatments will be provided.
  4. None
  5. 2 hours for 2 weeks; 4 session

1.16:  Systems Based Practice

  1. Required; first and second year residents
  2. Abigail Schlesinger, MD and invited faculty/guests
  3. This series is based on a training toolkit that has been developed by the Academy of American Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists.  This toolkit covers systems issues as they related to up to 13 systems that Child and Adolescent Psychaitrists come in contact with.  The content of these sessions were designed by experts in each system, but the actual interactive sessions are led by a resident and a faculty member in order to facilitate small group discussion and learning of the unique issues that face child and adolescent psychiatrists in systems such as schools, primary care, child welfare, early childhood and others. WPIC is helping to develop and pilot supervignettes, as an evaluation tool for this training toolkit
  4. None
  5. 13 sessions 1 hour a piece, offered every other year

1.17:  Ethics in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

  1. Required; first year residents
  2. Abigail Schlesinger, MD
  3. This series focuses on the ethical recommendations of the AMA, APA, and AACAP and provides an opportunity for residents to review specific issues related to autonomy, decision-making, capacity, research in minors, and ethical issues related to documentation.
  4. None
  5. 1 hour for 3 weeks, total 3 hours

1.18:  Career Development

  1. required, all child track and triple board residents
  2. Abigail Schlesinger, MD and invited speakers
  3. Discussion with various professional regarding the major career paths in psychiatry in various specialties and settings
  4. senior adult residents
  5. one hour weekly, 10 weeks, 10 sessions

1.19:  Quarterly Workshops

  1. Required for all residents
  2. Invited speakers by the Office of Residency Training
  3. A variety of clinically relevant topics are presented in a four hour workshop four times throughout the year intended to present state of the art information on topics chosen by ORT.  (examples have included: residents teaching residents, motivational interviewing, advocacy, normal development, reproductive health, complimentary medicine, bereavement and grief, advocacy, nonepileptic seizures, the history of psychiatry, cultural competency, intimate partner violence training and professionalism)
  4. Open to all
  5. Four hours; four times a year; 16 sessions

1.20:  Departmental Grand Rounds

  1. required for all residents
  2. invited speakers coordinated by the Chairman’s office
  3. a variety of clinically relevant topics are presented by nationally and internationally recognized experts, junior faculty from WPIC present their ongoing research, and principal investigators are invited to provide an overview of their research projects.
  4. Open attendance
  5. One and a half hours; bimonthly; 36 sessions

Year 2

2.01:  Forensic Psychiatry

  1. required; second year residents
  2. Steven Zerby, MD and invited faculty and legal experts
  3. This course prepares trainees to be comfortable in interacting with the legal system as an expert witness or a court appointed evaluator.  The topics covered are broad and include forensic criminal evaluations, family and child welfare law, custody evaluations, child abuse, guardianship, psychiatric malpractice, ethics.
  4. Senior adult residents
  5. one hour, weekly for 121 weeks; 12 session

2.02:  Systems Based Practice

  1. Required; first and second year residents
  2. Abigail Schlesinger, MD and invited faculty/guests
  3. This series is based on a training toolkit that has been developed by the Academy of American Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists.  This toolkit covers systems issues as they related to up to 13 systems that Child and Adolescent Psychaitrists come in contact with.  The content of these sessions were designed by experts in each system, but the actual interactive sessions are led by a resident and a faculty member in order to facilitate small group discussion and learning of the unique issues that face child and adolescent psychiatrists in systems such as schools, primary care, child welfare, early childhood and others. WPIC is helping to develop and pilot supervignettes, as an evaluation tool for this training toolkit    
  4. None
  5. 13 sessions 1 hour a piece, offered every other year

2.03:  Social and Community Psychiatry

  1. Required; second year residents
  2. Jack Rozel, MD and invited faculty
  3. A comprehensive course, under the direction of the institute of Public Health and Psychiatry, that addresses all aspects of community psychiatry, including historical aspects, research methodology, human service organizations, and political entities that interface with mental health systems.  This course provides for the foundation for the supervised community based experience in mental health consultation.
  4. Senior adult residents
  5. One hour, weekly for 16 weeks; 16 sessions

2.04:  Trauma – Assessment and Treatment

  1. Required; first and second year residents
  2. Judith Cohen, MD
  3. Over the course of 4 hours, issues related to Childhood Traumatic Stress will be presented…these stresses encompass a range of immediate, short-term and chronic effects of a variety of traumatic events which happen to children and adolescents, such as child abuse, community and domestic violence, accidents, disasters, war and traumatic grief.  Cognitive Behavioral Therapy has been shown to be efficacious in treating these children, sometimes in conjunction with psychopharmacologic agents…a review of the current evidence to support these treatments will be provided.
  4. None
  5. 2 hours for 2 weeks; 4 session

2.05:  Debates in Psychiatry

  1. required; second year residents
  2. Michael Travis, MD
  3. In this seminar two residents are required to debate a specific issue that relates to child psychiatry. The class than votes in order to determine which side won the debate.  One recent issue debated was whether stimulant use should be considered performance-enhancing, rather than medicinal
  4. Senior adult residents
  5. 1 hour for 13 weeks

2.06:  Journal Club

  1. required; first and second year residents
  2. Neal Ryan, MD
  3. This seminar requires that each resident select a review article on a topic of importance in child psychiatry, to review the strengths and weaknesses of the article, including methodology involved, and present this to the other class members
  4. Open to Senior Adult residents
  5. One hour; 8 sessions throughout the academic year; 8 sessions

2.07:  Developmental Processes Seminar

  1. required; first and second year residents
  2. Allison Hipwell PhD, Jennifer Silk PhD and invited speakers
  3. This interactive didactic seminar is designed to familiarize participants with normal development, developmental processes and trajectories.  There is an emphasis on brain and behavior interactions in development and an overall framework of clinical relevance to developmental, behavioral, and emotional disorders emerging in childhood and adolescence.  Participants are expected to learn about child and family development from gestation through young adulthood, using information drawn from psychology, developmental neurobiology, pediatrics, neuropsychology and epidemiology.
  4. Open to senior general adult residents, psychology interns and pediatrics residents
  5. Two hour sessions; weekly for nine months, every other year; 38 sessions

2.08:  Family Therapy Seminar

  1. required; second year residents
  2. Leonard Woods, MSW
  3. Seminar using didactics and case presentation where residents learn the skills of engagement, assessment and intervention emphasizing structural family therapy model.
  4. None
  5. One four hour session; 4 sessions

2.09:  Advanced Therapeutics Seminar

  1. required; second year residents
  2. Boris Birmaher, MD
  3. Case based discussion on eclectic and practical treatment approaches (both psychopharmacologic and psychotherapeutic) for working with children, adolescents and their families.
  4. None
  5. One hour; every other week for 9 months; 18 sessions

2.10:  Advanced Disruptive Behavior Disorders Seminar

  1. required, second year residents
  2. Srihari Bangalore, MD and invited speakers
  3. Didactic presentation drawing from the experience in first year (seminar 1.07) to expand knowledge in phenomenology, epidemiology, nosology and treatment of disruptive behavior disorders (including oppositional disorder, conduct disorder, ADHD and substance use) in children and adolescents
  4. None
  5. One hour, weekly for 6 weeks; 6 sessions

2.11:  Understanding Documentation

  1. Required; second year residents
  2. Jeremy Musher, MD
  3. This series discusses advanced issues related to documentation of clinical encounters, including issues related to billing, Joint-commission requirements, and corporate compliance.
  4. Senior adult residents
  5. Two hours; 1 hour weekly for two weeks

2.12:  Career Development

  1. required, all child track and triple board residents
  2. Abigail Schlesinger, MD and invited speakers
  3. Discussion with various professional regarding the major career paths in psychiatry in various specialties and settings
  4. senior adult residents
  5. one hour weekly, 10 weeks, 10 sessions

2.13:  Clinical Grand Rounds

  1. required for all residents
  2. senior residents
  3. clinical presentation by senior adult and child residents followed by discussion by a panel of interdisciplinary members and also by the audience.  Topic is of the senior resident’s choosing.
  4. Open attendance
  5. One and a half hours; monthly for 10 months; 10 sessions

2.14:  Quarterly Workshops

  1. Required for all residents
  2. invited speakers by the Office of Residency Training
  3. A variety of clinically relevant topics are presented in a four hour workshop four times throughout the year intended to present state of the art information on topics chosen by ORT.  (examples have included: normal development, reproductive health, complimentary medicine, bereavement and grief, advocacy, nonepileptic seizures, the history of psychiatry, cultural competency,  intimate partner violence training and professionalism)
  4. Open to all
  5. Four hours; four times a year; 16 sessions

2.15:  Departmental Grand Rounds

  1. Required; all residents
  2. invited speakers coordinated by the Chairman’s office
  3. a variety of clinically relevant topics are presented by nationally and internationally recognized experts, junior faculty from WPIC present their ongoing research, and principal investigators are invited to provide an overview of their research projects.
  4. Open attendance
  5. One and a half hours; bimonthly

2.16:  Forensic Psychiatry

  1. Required PGY4 and PGY5 course
  2. Christine Martone, MD (Course Director) and invited judicial and psychiatric speakers
  3. Psychiatry
  4. Full time
  5. An advanced course that prepares trainees to be comfortable interacting with the legal system as an expert witness or a court appointed evaluator.  The course covers a broad range of topics including forensic criminal evaluations, family and child welfare law, custody evaluations, child abuse, guardianships, consent, psychiatric malpractice, and use of psychiatric evidence in courts.
  6. Weekly, for 15 weeks, 1 hour sessions (15 hours)