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Course Descriptions

PGY1    PGY2    PGY3    PGY4

PGY1

1.01. New Resident Orientation

  • Required PGY1 course; newly starting PGY4 child residents attend selected portions.
  • M. Travis, MD, A. Schlesinger, MD, A Douaihy, MD, Chief Residents, and invited speakers.
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • A didactic and experiential course designed to rapidly orient new trainees to both WPIC and their role as psychiatrists/team leaders within a multidisciplinary setting. The major areas covered are “organizational survival skills”, with emphasis on problem-solving techniques, communication, time management, and feedback systems; “clinical survival skills” introduce management of medical and psychiatric emergencies, legal and ethical issues, and meeting NAME family members. Additionally, new residents are provided a manual that has comprehensive information on all aspects of their training.
  • 8 full days (approximately 50 hours)

1.02. Introduction to Clinical Psychiatry

  • Required PGY1 course
  • K. Prasad, MD (Course Director)
  • Psychiatric
  • Full time
  • This is a survey course that introduces general principles of doctor-patient relations, assessment, differential diagnosis, and treatment of major psychiatric categories (mood, anxiety, personality disorders, psychosis, acquired brain injury, geriatrics, and somatoform disorders, child development, substance-related disorders). 
  • Weekly, for 8, 1.5 hour sessions plus one three hour session (15 hours)

1.03. Introduction to Psychopharmacology

  • Required PGY1 course
  • T Denko, MD (Course Director)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This is a survey course designed to give the residents an overview of the basic pharmacotherapy used to treat psychiatric illnesses. The course cover basic pharmacodynamics, pharmacodynamics and drug interactions in addition to an illness focused discussion of specific medications
  • Weekly, for 8, 1.5 hour sessions, (12 hours)

1.04. Introduction to Clinical Neuroscience

  • Required PGY1 course
  • Dr. David Lewis, MD (Course Director)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This course is designed to give starting residents a basic grounding in the important techniques and methods used in clinical neuroscience and the importance of these to everyday clinical practice. This is illustrated by use of major finding from clinical neuroscience and the impact these have had on psychiatric understanding and practice
  • 4, 1 hour sessions (4 hours)

1.05. Introduction to Evidence based Psychiatry

  • Required PGY1 course
  • J. Brar, MD (Course Director) and library staff 
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This course is intended to introduce the residents to the common concepts of evidence based medicine and is combined with library training in the use of online databases and online and offline resources. A paper is discussed each week and each resident is expected to comment on a specific aspect of the paper in a rotating fashion. The residents will gain a basic understanding of critically appraising the literature.
  • Weekly, 10, 1 hour sessions (10 hours)

1.06. Introduction to Biostatistics

  • Required PGY1 course
  • J. Brar, MD (Course Director)
  • Psychiatry 
  • Full time 
  • This course provides orientation to emergency psychiatry and introduces principles of emergency psychiatric interview; assessment and management of suicidality and violence; toxicology of substances of abuse; differential diagnosis of psychoses, anxiety and mood disorders in emergency settings; physical, sexual, and child abuse; psychiatric manifestations of neurological/medical conditions; involuntary treatment; interaction with managed care entities and community resources. The teaching format includes morning reports, case presentations, lectures, and discussions
  • Weekly, 4, 1 hour sessions, (4 hours)

1.07. Neuropsychiatry

  • Required PGY1 course
  • R. Marin, MD (Course Director)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • Introduces residents to concepts of brain-behavior relationship; review of neuroanatomy; bedside neuropsychiatry assessment; neuropsychiatric laboratory methodologies (psychological testing, EEG, structural and functional imaging); and developing neuropsychiatric formulations.
  • Weekly, 6, 1 hour sessions (6 hours)

1.08. Introduction to Psychotherapy

  • Required PGY1 course
  • MG Walters, MD, and A. Kauffman, PhD, (Course Directors), 
  • Psychiatry/Psychology
  • Full time
  • Introduction to psychodynamic psychotherapy includes a survey of historical developments, conceptual frameworks and clinical applications of psychotherapy. The format includes lectures, videotape case presentations, and discussions.
  • Weekly, 8, 1.5 hour sessions (12 hours)

1.09. Epidemiology

  • Required PGY1 course
  • M. Ganguli, MD, (Course Director), 
  • Psychiatry/Psychology
  • Full time
  • A basic introduction to epidemiological methods and major studies. Designed to give the PGY1 residents a core understading of epidemiological terms and principles.
  • Weekly, 4, 1 hour sessions (4 hours)

1.10. Inpatient Case Conference/Case Discussions

  • Required for PGY1 and PGY2, optional for PGY3 and PGY4
  • Housestaff Leadership (Case Conference Coordinators) and various psychiatric faculty
  • Psychiatry/Psychology
  • Full time
  • Residents have weekly case conferences in which they cover a variety of topics including interviewing, psychiatric education, emergency psychiatry, neuropsychiatry, forensic psychiatry. Residents are responsible for providing appropriate patients/cases from the inpatient units to participate in the case conferences. Attending physicians either model interviewing of the patients, or observe resident interviews, followed by discussion of the cases. 
  • Every weeks for 30 weeks, 1 hours sessions, (30 hours)

1.11. Departmental (Clinical) Grand Rounds Required for all residents

  • Required for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4), attending by all staff and faculty 
  • Invited speakers coordinated by the Chairman’s Office
  • Various disciplines, but primarily psychiatry
  • N/A
  • Nationally-and internationally- recognized experts present a variety of clinically relevant topics, junior faculty from WPIC present their ongoing research, and principal investigators are invited to provide an overview of their research projects. The series is intended to present state-of-the-art information.
  • Bimonthly on average, Friday’s 11-12:30

1.12. Resident Grand Rounds

  • Required for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4), attending by staff and faculty 
  • Chief Residents
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • Clinical case presentations by PGY4 Adult and PGY5 Child residents, followed by discussion and review of contemporary state of knowledge. Format includes resident case presentations, interview by moderator of panel, and discussions with multidisciplinary faculty panel and the audience.
  • Approximately bimonthly, 14 sessions (21 hours)

1.13. Quarterly Workshop

  • Required for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4)
  • Invited speakers coordinated by the Office of Residency Training
  • Various disciplines, but primarily psychiatry
  • N/A
  • These workshops are developed yearly based on overall needs of the program as assessed by the residents, faculty, and areas of relative weakness (as in this year, outcome data on PRITE and board scores). The four workshops this year address physician response to suicide, "Minds on the edge", the Internet and Psychiatry and the History of Psychiatry.
  • Quarterly (16 hours)

1.14. Psychological Theories and development

  • Required PGY1 course
  • K. Blair, PhD, (Course Director)
  • Psychiatry/Psychology
  • Full time
  • An overview of the development of psychological theories as they relate to the explanation of psychological processes and the theories underpinning various psychotherapeutic techniques. This course also looks at the development of these processes over the lifespan and equips the residents with the basic terminology.
  • Weekly, 8, 1.5 hour sessions, (12 hours)

1.15. Intro to interviewing, assessment and diagnosis

  • Mandatory for all residents
  • K. Patterson, MD (Course Director)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time 
  • This course provides a framework for learning basic interviewing skills, developing a DSM-IV differential diagnosis, and case presentation. The course incorporates live interviews, case presentations, and discussion. All major DSM-IV diagnostic groups are reviewed. Direct verbal and written feedback given. Residents are observed whilst conducting psychiatric interviews. Their peers and the supervisor then provide feedback regarding the interview style, information gathered, case formulation to strengthen interviewing technique.
  • Weekly, for 10, 1 hour sessions (10 hours), during the DEC rotation

1.16. WPIC Wide Journal Club

  • Mandatory for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4)
  • M. Travis, MD (Coordinator)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • A journal club to which all WPIC staff are invited. PGY2 Resident or psychology intern presents a high impact data driven paper chosen by the Journal Club Committee. The presenter work closely with a Junior Faculty member who will act as the Chair of the Journal Club. Experts are invited from senior or visiting faculty. Discussion of the paper is between the audience expert and presenter.
    f. Once a week, in 3 ten week blocks (30 hours)

PGY2

2.01. Mood Disorders

  • Required for PGY2
  • R. Haskett, MD (Course Director) and invited speakers
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This course provides an overview of assessment, differential diagnosis, and treatment of major depression, mania, and personality disorders. The approach is biopsychosocial, and incorporates gender and cultural perspectives.
  • Weekly, for 10, 2 hour sessions (20 hours)

2.02. Schizophrenia & other Psychotic Disorders

  • Required for PGY2
  • M. Travis, MD (Course Director) and invited speakers
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This course provides an overview of assessment, differential diagnosis, and treatment of schizophrenia and related chronic psychoses. There is also review of epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, and course of illness and outcome. The approach is biopsychosocial, and incorporates gender, racial, and cultural perspectives.
  • Weekly, for 8, 2 hour sessions (16 hours)

2.03. Addiction Medicine

  • Required PGY2 course
  • A. Douaihy, MD (Course Director) and invited speakers
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This course addresses the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of substance addiction and abuse. The course also focuses on the assessment, differential diagnosis of “dual-diagnosis” patients and their management. There is also review of epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, and course of addiction and outcome. The approach is biopsychosocial, and incorporates gender, racial, and cultural perspectives.
  • Weekly, for 8, 2 hour sessions (16 hours)

2.04. Anxiety and Trauma Disorders

  • Required PGY2 course
  • A. Fertig, MD (Course Director) and invited speakers
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This course addresses the phenomenology of anxiety disorders, differential diagnosis, pharmacological treatment, cognitive behavioral treatment, combined treatment strategies, and introduction to neurobiological substrates of anxiety disorders.
  • Weekly, 10, 2 hour sessions (20 hours)

2.05. Cognitive/Degenerative Diseases

  • Required PGY2 course
  • M. Miller, MD (Course Director) and invited speakers
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This course progresses from basic to advanced principles of diagnosis and treatment of major psychiatric disorders in the elderly. Topics covered include the biology and psychology of aging, epidemiology of late-life mental disorders, geriatric medicine and psychopharmacology, functional and diagnostic assessment, major psychiatric disorders of late-life, intimacy and sexuality, bereavement, and practical management issues in nursing homes.
  • Weekly, 6, 2 hour sessions (12 hours)

2.06. Neuropsychiatry- II

  • Required PGY2 course
  • R. Marin, MD (Course Director)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • Introduces residents to neuropsychiatric syndromes commonly encountered in psychiatric settings, with an initial review of functional neuroanatomy. This course reviews disorders of memory, deliriums, seizure disorders, head injury, and degenerative movement disorders.
  • Weekly, 9, 1 hour sessions (9 hours)

2.07. Law & Psychiatry

  • Required PGY2 course
  • R. Wettstein, MD (Course Director) and invited speakers
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time/volunteer faculty
  • This seminar provides didactics and practical training in the interface between psychiatry and legal systems. Didactics address topics such as ethics in psychiatry, psychiatric malpractice, confidentiality and privilege, dangerousness, family mental health law, informed consent and competency, criminal forensic psychiatry, as well more contemporary issues of assisted suicide/right to die and the impact of managed care. Teaching format includes lectures, guided readings, and case consultations. Residents take a comprehensive open-book exam at the end of course. The course serves as the foundation for more advanced discussion of these issues as well as the experiential portion of forensic psychiatry.
  • Weekly, 10 sessions (10 hours)

2.08. Autism/Developmental Disorders/MR

  • Required PGY2 course
  • Martin Lubetsky, MD (Course Director) and invited speakers
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This is a comprehensive course that provides theoretical and practical information on topics relevant to the assessment and treatment of with pervasive developmental disorders, autism and mental retardation. The teaching format includes lectures and case presentations with live interview. After a comprehensive overview of child development, major diagnostic groups are addressed with regard to epidemiology, genetics, diagnosis, treatment, and pathophysiology. Systems of care and child abuse issues are also addressed in this course.
  • Weekly, 8, 2 hour sessions (17 hours)

2.09. Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT)

  • Required PGY2 course
  • M Miller MD and H Schwartz, MD (course directors)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This course follows the Introduction to Psychotherapy course where the resident has been exposed to the basic tents of psychodynamic psychotherapy, The purpose of this course is to teach the resident how to assess patients For suitability for short-term therapy, lasting from 3-6 months. Learning to focus on a small number of problem areas, sustaining that focus, utilizing the contractual time pressure of the short term agreement and learning to terminate are all concepts that are stressed in this course. The model therapy for this course is the Interpersonal Psychotherapy and residents are taught to conceptualize and follow the manualized tenets of IPT, however, comparisons are drawn with other short-term approaches such as those of Sifenos, Davanloo, Mann, Malan, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and Dialectical Behavior Therapy where appropriate.
  • Weekly, 24, 1 Hour sessions, (24 hours)

2.10. Psychodynamic Psychotherapy

  • Required PGY2 course
  • P. Scott, MD (Course Director)
  • Psychiatry
  • Volunteer
  • This course is designed to initiate the residents into their first experiences in individual psychotherapy and provide a conceptual and practical framework for the clinical work. The course is modeled after the Balint method of teaching the psychological aspects of medical practice and the doctor-patient relationship. Case – centered group discussions are utilized.
  • Weekly, 19, 1 hour sessions (19 hours)

2.11. Inpatient Case Conference/Case Discussions

  • Required for PGY1 and PGY2, optional for PGY3 and PGY4
  • Housestaff Leadership (Case Conference Coordinators) and various psychiatric faculty
  • Psychiatry/Psychology
  • Full time
  • Residents have weekly case conferences in which they cover a variety of topics including interviewing, psychiatric education, emergency psychiatry, neuropsychiatry, forensic psychiatry. Residents are responsible for providing appropriate patients/cases from the inpatient units to participate in the case conferences. Attending physicians either model interviewing of the patients, or observe resident interviews, followed by discussion of the cases. 
  • Every weeks for 30 weeks, 1 hours sessions, (30 hours)

2.12. Departmental (Clinical) Grand Rounds Required for all residents

  • Required for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4), attending by all staff and faculty 
  • Invited speakers coordinated by the Chairman’s Office
  • Various disciplines, but primarily psychiatry
  • N/A
  • Nationally-and internationally- recognized experts present a variety of clinically relevant topics, junior faculty from WPIC present their ongoing research, and principal investigators are invited to provide an overview of their research projects. The series is intended to present state-of-the-art information. 
  • Bimonthly on average, Friday’s 11-12:30

2.13. Resident Grand Rounds

  • Required for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4), attending by staff and faculty 
  • Chief Residents
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • Clinical case presentations by PGY4 Adult and PGY5 Child residents, followed by discussion and review of contemporary state of knowledge. Format includes resident case presentations, interview by moderator of panel, and discussions with multidisciplinary faculty panel and the audience.
  • Approximately bimonthly, 14 sessions (21 hours)

2.14. Quarterly Workshop

  • Required for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4)
  • Invited speakers coordinated by the Office of Residency Training
  • Various disciplines, but primarily psychiatry
  • N/A
  • These workshops are developed yearly based on overall needs of the program as assessed by the residents, faculty, and areas of relative weakness (as in this year, outcome data on PRITE and board scores). The four workshops this year address physician response to suicide, "Minds on the edge", the Internet and Psychiatry and the History of Psychiatry.
  • Quarterly (16 hours)

2.15. WPIC Wide Journal Club

  • Mandatory for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4)
  • M. Travis, MD (Coordinator)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • A journal club to which all WPIC staff are invited. PGY2 Resident or psychology intern presents a high impact data driven paper chosen by the Journal Club Committee. The presenter work closely with a Junior Faculty member who will act as the Chair of the Journal Club. Experts are invited from senior or visiting faculty. Discussion of the paper is between the audience expert and presenter.
  • Once a week, in 3 ten week blocks (30 hours)

PGY3

3.01. Family Therapy

  • Required PGY3 course
  • L. Woods (Course Director) and invited speakers
  • Psychology/Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • Presentations of short-term, structured model of family therapy, using didactics, videotapes, and discussion
  • Weekly, 10, 1 hour sessions (10 hours)

3.02. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

  • Required PGY3 course
  • E. Friedman, MD (Course Director) and invited speakers
  • Psychiatry/Psychology
  • Full time
  • In this course, residents learn to conduct cognitive and behavioral therapy using, as a model, Beck’s cognitive therapy of treatment of depression,. The teaching format includes lectures guided reading, and case discussion. Each resident is required to treat one patient, assigned and supervised by the teaching faculty.
  • Weekly, 25, 1 hour sessions (25 hours)

3.03. Evidence Based Medicine

  • Required PGY3 course
  • N. Ryan, MD (Course Director) and M. Travis, MD
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This seminar expands upon the principles taught in the Evidence Based Medicine course presented in PGY1. This is a seminar in which each resident is required under supervision of the course instructors to select a review article and an original research article on a topic of importance to clinical psychiatry, to review in detail the strengths, weaknesses and conceptual underpinnings of the articles, including in depth discussion of the psychiatric methodology involved, and then to present this to the entire class.
  • Weekly, 25 sessions, (25 hours)

3.04. Group Therapy

  • Required PGY3 course
  • F Ghinassi, PhD (Course Director)
  • Psychology
  • Full time
  • This course is designed to teach basic skills and principles of group psychotherapy. Various formats will be explored, including inpatient, outpatient and theme-centered groups. 
  • Weekly, 12, 1 hour sessions (12 hours)

3.05. Longitudinal Clinic for Psychotic Disorders and Chronic Mental Illness (CCS) Case Conference

  • Required PGY3 conference, attending by all staff and faculty in the clinic
  • P. Vaulx-Smith, MD (Case Conference Coordinator)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • Clinical case presentation is performed by PGY3 residents followed by discussion and review of psychiatric challenges faced when treating the persistent mentally ill.
  • Weekly, 45 Sessions (45 hours)

3.06. Personality Disorders

  • Required PGY3 course
  • Dr. P. Soloff, MD (Course Director)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • Didactic based seminar to focus on personality disorders-building blocks, defensive mechanisms, epidemiology, genetics, criteria for diagnosis and treatment issues.
  • Weekly,4, 2 hour sessions (8 hours)

3.07. Advanced Topics in Psychosis

  • Required PGY3 course
  • R. Reddy, MD (Course Director) and selected faculty
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • The goal is to build on previous introductory didactics to assessment, diagnosis and treatment of schizophrenia and related chronic psychosis. The resident should become familiar with the methods of investigating the illness, genetic and epidemiological information, be adept at evaluating negative symptoms and positive symptoms and develop a solid foundation for rational pharmacologic and psychosocial interventions/treatment.
  • Weekly, 7, 1 hour sessions (7 hours)

3.08. Longitudinal Clinic for Psychotic Disorders and Chronic Mental Illness (CCS) Case Conference

  • Required PGY3 conference, attending by all staff and faculty in the clinic
  • P. Vaulx-Smith, MD (Case Conference Coordinator)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • Clinical case presentation is performed by PGY3 residents followed by discussion and review of psychiatric challenges faced when treating the persistent mentally ill.
  • Weekly, 45 Sessions (45 hours)

3.09. Eating Disorders

  • Required PGY3 course
  • Eric Rickin, MD (Course Director) and selected faculty
  • Psychiatry/Psychology
  • Fulltime
  • The goal of this course is to give a comprehensive and depthful understand of the diagnosis and management of eating disorders. The course utilizes the latest research and the approach is biopsychosocial. The course incorporates gender, racial, and cultural perspectives.
  • Weekly, 6, 1 hour sessions (6 hours)

3.10. Somatoform disorders

  • Required PGY3 course
  • A. Schlesinger MD (Course Director)
  • Psychiatry
  • Fulltime
  • This course covers aims to give a broad understanding of the biopsychosocial aspects of somatoform disorders and how these relate to their diagnosis, management and outcome.
  • Weekly, 4, 1 hour sessions (4 hours)

3.11. Sleep disorders

  • Required PGY3 course
  • D. Buysee, MD (Course Director) and various psychiatry faculty
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • The goal of this course is to give an overview of the sleep disorders most commonly seen in medical and psychiatric practice. Based on the latest research this course covers the diagnosis management and outcome of these disorders. The approach is biopsychosocial
  • Weekly, 6, 1 hours Sessions (6 hours)

3.12. Sexual Disorders

  • Required PGY3 course
  • R. Schwartz, MD (Course Director)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This course aims to give the residents a grounding in the diagnosis, management and prognosis of the sexual disorders most likely to be encountered in psychiatry. In addition to discussion of disorders of sexual function this course will also explore disorders of gender. The course utilizes the latest research and the approach is biopsychosocial. The course incorporates gender, racial, and cultural perspectives.
  • Weekly, 4, 1 hours Sessions (4 hours)

3.13. HIV Psychiatry

  • Required PGY3 course
  • A. Douaihy, MD (Course Director)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This course aims to cover the major psychiatric manifestations of HIV, their diagnosis, management and prognosis. The course utilizes the latest research and the approach is biopsychosocial. The course incorporates gender, racial, and cultural perspectives.
  • Weekly, 4, 1 hours Sessions (4 hours)

3.14. Cultural Psychiatry

  • Required PGY3 course
  • A. Douaihy, MD (Course Director)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This short course aims to integrate issues of cultural diversity with mainstream practice of psychiatry. The course is interactive in nature and incorporates gender, racial, and cultural perspectives.
  • Weekly, 2, 1 hour Sessions (2 hours)

3.15. Spirituality

  • Required PGY3 course
  • A. Douaihy, MD (Course Director)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • This short course aims to integrate issues of spirituality with mainstream practice of psychiatry. The course is interactive in nature and incorporates gender, racial, and cultural perspectives.
  • Weekly, 2, 1 hour Sessions (2 hours)

3.16. Practical Issues in Psychiatry

  • Required PGY3 course
  • A. Schlesinger, MD, (Course Director), with K. Nash, MD and A. DiMartini, MD
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • The goal of this course is to address practical issues in Psychiatry, such as careers, supervision, teaching, professional development and systems of care.
  • Weekly, 28, 1 hour sessions, (28 hours)

3.17. Inpatient Case Conference/Case Discussions

  • Required for PGY1 and PGY2, optional for PGY3 and PGY4
  • Housestaff Leadership (Case Conference Coordinators) and various psychiatric faculty
  • Psychiatry/Psychology
  • Full time
  • Residents have weekly case conferences in which they cover a variety of topics including interviewing, psychiatric education, emergency psychiatry, neuropsychiatry, forensic psychiatry. Residents are responsible for providing appropriate patients/cases from the inpatient units to participate in the case conferences. Attending physicians either model interviewing of the patients, or observe resident interviews, followed by discussion of the cases.
  • Every weeks for 30 weeks, 1 hours sessions, (30 hours)

3.18.  Quarterly Workshop

  • Required for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4)
  • Invited speakers coordinated by the Office of Residency Training
  • Various disciplines, but primarily psychiatry
  • N/A
  • These workshops are developed yearly based on overall needs of the program as assessed by the residents, faculty, and areas of relative weakness (as in this year, outcome data on PRITE and board scores). The four workshops this year address physician response to suicide, "Minds on the edge", the Internet and Psychiatry and the History of Psychiatry.
  • Quarterly (16 hours)

3.19. WPIC Wide Journal Club

  • Mandatory for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4)
  • M. Travis, MD (Coordinator)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • A journal club to which all WPIC staff are invited. PGY2 Resident or psychology intern presents a high impact data driven paper chosen by the Journal Club Committee. The presenter work closely with a Junior Faculty member who will act as the Chair of the Journal Club. Experts are invited from senior or visiting faculty. Discussion of the paper is between the audience expert and presenter.
  • Once a week, in 3 ten week blocks (30 hours)

3.20. Departmental (Clinical) Grand Rounds Required for all residents

  • Required for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4), attending by all staff and faculty 
  • Invited speakers coordinated by the Chairman’s Office
  • Various disciplines, but primarily psychiatry
  • N/A
  • Nationally-and internationally- recognized experts present a variety of clinically relevant topics, junior faculty from WPIC present their ongoing research, and principal investigators are invited to provide an overview of their research projects. The series is intended to present state-of-the-art information. 
  • Bimonthly on average, Friday’s 11-12:30

3.21. Resident Grand Rounds

  • Required for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4), attending by staff and faculty 
  • Chief Residents
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • Clinical case presentations by PGY4 Adult and PGY5 Child residents, followed by discussion and review of contemporary state of knowledge. Format includes resident case presentations, interview by moderator of panel, and discussions with multidisciplinary faculty panel and the audience.
  • Approximately bimonthly, 14 sessions (21 hours)

PGY4

4.01. Forensic Psychiatry

  • Required PGY4 and PGY5 course
  • C. Martone,, MD (Course Director) and invited judicial and psychiatric speakers
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • An advanced course that prepares trainees to be comfortable interacting with the legal system as an expert witness or a court appointed evaluator. The course covers a broad range of topics including forensic criminal evaluations, family and child welfare law, custody evaluations, child abuse, guardianships, consent, psychiatric malpractice, and use of psychiatric evidence in courts.
  • Weekly, 15, 1 hour sessions (15 hours)

4.02. Social & Community Psychiatry

  • Required PGY4 and PGY5 course
  • J. Rozel MD (Course Director) and invited speakers
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • A comprehensive course, under the direction of the Institute of Public Health & Psychiatry, that addresses all aspects of social and community psychiatry, including historical aspects, research methodology, human service organizations and political entities that interface with mental health systems. This course provides for the foundation for the supervised field experience in mental health consultation in selected settings in the Western region of Pennsylvania.
  • Weekly, 22, 1 hour sessions (22 hours)

4.03. Continuous Case Conference

  • Required PGY4 course
  • M. Stewart, MD and E. Gorry, MD (Course Directors)
  • Psychiatry
  • Volunteer faculty
  • Interactive didactic and case-based seminar using group supervision to address technique and other topics and issues that arise in the psychotherapeutic treatment of adults.
  • Weekly, 33, 1 hour sessions (33 hours)

4.04. Theoretical and practical Issues in Psychiatry II

  • Required PGY4 course
  • A. Schlesinger, MD. (Course Director), with K. Nash, MD, A DiMartini, MD, and invited faculty
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • The goal of this course is to follow-on from the PGY3 course and further address practical issues in Psychiatry, such as careers, supervision, teaching, professional development and systems of care. The PGY4 course also includes sessions dedicated to Administrative Psychiatry and Psychiatry and Ethics
  • Weekly, 24, 1 hour sessions, (24 hours)

4.05. Further Professional Development

  • Required PGY4 course
  • R. Marin, MD (Course Director) and invited speakers
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • Using semi structured discussions, guided reading and a variety of methods designed to elicit from resident questions, goals and experiences that comprise contents of sessions, faculty attempt to help residents develop creative and useful ways to integrate their growth as people with their growth as professionals.
  • Weekly, 10 , 1 hour sessions (11 hours)

4.06. Inpatient Case Conference/Case Discussions

  • Required for PGY1 and PGY2, optional for PGY3 and PGY4
  • Housestaff Leadership (Case Conference Coordinators) and various psychiatric faculty
  • Psychiatry/Psychology
  • Full time
  • Residents have weekly case conferences in which they cover a variety of topics including interviewing, psychiatric education, emergency psychiatry, neuropsychiatry, forensic psychiatry. Residents are responsible for providing appropriate patients/cases from the inpatient units to participate in the case conferences. Attending physicians either model interviewing of the patients, or observe resident interviews, followed by discussion of the cases. 
  • Every weeks for 30 weeks, 1 hours sessions, (30 hours)

4.07. Quarterly Workshop

  • Required for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4)
  • Invited speakers coordinated by the Office of Residency Training
  • Various disciplines, but primarily psychiatry
  • N/A
  • These workshops are developed yearly based on overall needs of the program as assessed by the residents, faculty, and areas of relative weakness (as in this year, outcome data on PRITE and board scores). The four workshops this year address physician response to suicide, "Minds on the edge", the Internet and Psychiatry and the History of Psychiatry.
  • Quarterly (16 hours)

4.08. WPIC Wide Journal Club

  • Mandatory for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4)
  • M. Travis, MD (Coordinator)
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • A journal club to which all WPIC staff are invited. PGY2 Resident or psychology intern presents a high impact data driven paper chosen by the Journal Club Committee. The presenter work closely with a Junior Faculty member who will act as the Chair of the Journal Club. Experts are invited from senior or visiting faculty. Discussion of the paper is between the audience expert and presenter.
  • Once a week, in 3 ten week blocks (30 hours)

4.09. Departmental (Clinical) Grand Rounds Required for all residents

  • Required for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4), attending by all staff and faculty 
  • Invited speakers coordinated by the Chairman’s Office
  • Various disciplines, but primarily psychiatry
  • N/A
  • Nationally-and internationally- recognized experts present a variety of clinically relevant topics, junior faculty from WPIC present their ongoing research, and principal investigators are invited to provide an overview of their research projects. The series is intended to present state-of-the-art information. 
  • Bimonthly on average, Friday’s 11-12:30

4.10. Resident Grand Rounds

  • Required for all residents (PGY1 through PGY4), attending by staff and faculty. Required presentation in PGY4
  • Chief Residents
  • Psychiatry
  • Full time
  • Clinical case presentations by PGY4 Adult and PGY5 Child residents, followed by discussion and review of contemporary state of knowledge. Format includes resident case presentations, interview by moderator of panel, and discussions with multidisciplinary faculty panel and the audience.
  • Approximately bimonthly, 14 sessions (21 hours)